the-disney-elite:

Glen Keane’s(?) pencil animation for The Fox and the Hound.

the-disney-elite:

Glen Keane’s(?) pencil animation for The Fox and the Hound.

pixarchan:

Aladdin & Jasmine’s storyboards and sketches by Glen Keane & Mark Henn

pixarchan:

Aladdin & Jasmine’s storyboards and sketches by Glen Keane & Mark Henn

pixarchan:

Aladdin’s expressions by Glen Keane :)

pixarchan:

Aladdin’s expressions by Glen Keane :)

rememberwhencartoons:

What’s that? It’s Sexy Glen Keane Tarzan Thursday? Why not.

It’s weird, it seems that when you run up against a problem, you always think it’s because “oh I’m not good enough”. But- it’s not that, it’s just that you’ve kind of hit the limit of your knowledge, and you’ve got to go out and observe and get and find and discover and nothing more. Those are really great, those are the best times- when you feel like you stink and you can’t get it- that’s like, man, now the world is open and you’re ready to learn something new and you gotta go, you gotta take advantage of that.
Glen Keane, “The Animation Podcast” (via archenjol)

rokhareal:

that one time me and one of my better friends met Glen Keane :3

I have been Inspired by your art for years. But my question is this what is it that you believe makes your art stand out the most compared to the men who came before you and really paved the way for this wonderful art form. I'm trying to be more original but I feel like my art is just not strong enough.

I’m not affiliated with Glen Keane, Claire Keane, or Disney in anyway. I’m just a big fan of their art styles! 

However here’s an interview from the 2012 Dallas Film Festival where Glen talks about some things related to your question:

runningracingdancingchasing:

That last gif set made me think of this.
the-disney-elite:

Glen Keane’s anatomical model sheet for Beast, Beauty and the Beast.

the-disney-elite:

Glen Keane’s anatomical model sheet for Beast, Beauty and the Beast.

skunkandburningtires:

Glen Keane’s 7 Animation Essentials
1. Make a Positive Statement
Do not be ambiguous in your approach.
Thumbnail until you have that clear approach and conviction.
Be bold and decisive.
2. Animate From the Heart
Feel your drawings.
Let your action be an extension of how you believe the character feels.
Put yourself in the place of the character your animating- associate.
3. Make Expressions and Attitudes Real and Living
Focus on the eyes and eyebrows, mouth and cheeks.
Always lead with the eyes.
Be sure the eyes are solid and placed securely in the head.
Study your own attitudes. Ask yourself, “Does this drawing feel the way my face feels?”
4. Draw As If You Were Sculpting
Describe the forms in dimension.
Understand the character design in 3D.
5. Animate the Forces
Allow the momentum of and already animated movement to suggest the next drawing.
Draw the leading edge of forces.
6. Visualize and Feel Dialogue
Be sure you are truly capturing the inflection, volume and tone of the dialog with proper mouth shapes.
7. Simplicity
What is the essence of your scene, your action, your expression — what is indispensable in communicating your thought?

skunkandburningtires:

Glen Keane’s 7 Animation Essentials

1. Make a Positive Statement

  • Do not be ambiguous in your approach.
  • Thumbnail until you have that clear approach and conviction.
  • Be bold and decisive.

2. Animate From the Heart

  • Feel your drawings.
  • Let your action be an extension of how you believe the character feels.
  • Put yourself in the place of the character your animating- associate.

3. Make Expressions and Attitudes Real and Living

  • Focus on the eyes and eyebrows, mouth and cheeks.
  • Always lead with the eyes.
  • Be sure the eyes are solid and placed securely in the head.
  • Study your own attitudes. Ask yourself, “Does this drawing feel the way my face feels?”

4. Draw As If You Were Sculpting

  • Describe the forms in dimension.
  • Understand the character design in 3D.

5. Animate the Forces

  • Allow the momentum of and already animated movement to suggest the next drawing.
  • Draw the leading edge of forces.

6. Visualize and Feel Dialogue

  • Be sure you are truly capturing the inflection, volume and tone of the dialog with proper mouth shapes.

7. Simplicity

  • What is the essence of your scene, your action, your expression — what is indispensable in communicating your thought?

claireonacloud:

early concept design for Anna from Frozen. More Anna posts coming soon….

claireonacloud:

My visual development during the making of Frozen for Elsa and Anna’s relationship while growing up.

scurviesdisneyblog:

Pocahontas by Glen Keane

scurviesdisneyblog:

Pocahontas by Glen Keane